Skip to main content

Blacklisting rumours

EditorialAugust 25, 2019

IT is by now sufficiently obvious that rumours of Pakistan having been ‘blacklisted’ by the regional affiliate of the Financial Action Task Force was malicious fake news, floated initially by the Press Trust of India. From there, the word was amplified by prominent Indian journalists on social media, and it then echoed large in various other Indian news outlets. The news was deliberately angled to make the real outcome of the meeting appear to be something that it was not. The language used by the Indian media was that Pakistan was placed on an ‘enhanced blacklist’ by the Asia Pacific Group, the regional affiliate of FATF, whereas the reality was that Pakistan had been placed in a category called ‘enhanced follow up’. The word ‘blacklist’ was added to warp the meaning of the story into something altogether different. In fact, the APG does not maintain any ‘blacklist’, and FATF is not scheduled to make any decision on Pakistan until October.

In the meantime, the rumour spread like wildfire in Pakistan. The stock market, which had seen a bull run for four days, opened on a positive note on Friday, but then took steep losses right after the ‘blacklisting’ story broke. Market players confirmed that investor anxiety about a possible blacklisting was behind the declines. By the close of trade, a weeklong bull run had ended, with the market falling by 534 points. The government was slow in responding, given the speed with which the rumour spread. The first word we heard from the finance ministry came around 12:45pm, when a short, single-line ticker was released for TV channels denying the news. That had no effect. Less than an hour later, local media outlets began uploading the correct version of the story based on their own reporting, again to little effect. A more detailed contradiction was issued by the finance ministry shortly after 2pm, which too had little effect till the day’s end. It is worth asking now why investors and the wider public in Pakistan no longer know whether or not to believe what the government and the local media tell them. The current atmosphere of censorship has created a gulf between Pakistani institutions — both the media and government — and their audience, in a way that the country has become vulnerable to fake news attacks originating from outside. Restoring this trust and credibility between the government and media is now key to thwarting a similar episode.

Published in Dawn, August 25th, 2019

https://www.dawn.com/news/1501522

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

SSG Commando Muddassir Iqbal of Pakistan Army

“ Commando Muddassir Iqbal was part of the team who conducted Army Public School operation on 16 December 2014. In this video he reveals that he along with other commandos was ordered to kill the innocent children inside school, when asked why should they kill children after killing all the terrorist he was told that it would be a chance to defame Taliban and get nation on the side. He and all other commandos killed children and later Taliban was blamed.
Muddassir Iqbal has deserted the military and now he is  with mujahedeen somewhere in AF PAK border area”
For authenticity of  this tape journalists can easy reach to his home town to interview his family members or   ISPR as he reveals his army service number”
Asalam o Alaikum: My name is Muddassir Iqbal. My father’s name is Naimat Ali. I belong to Sialkot divison (Punjab province), my village is Shamsher Poor and district, tehsil and post office  Narowal. Unfortunately I was working in Pakistan army. I feel embarrassed to tell you …

The Rise of China-Europe Railways

https://www.csis.org/analysis/rise-china-europe-railways

The Rise of China-Europe RailwaysMarch 6, 2018The Dawn of a New Commercial Era?For over two millennia, technology and politics have shaped trade across the Eurasian supercontinent. The compass and domesticated camels helped the “silk routes” emerge between 200 and 400 CE, and peaceful interactions between the Han and Hellenic empires allowed overland trade to flourish. A major shift occurred in the late fifteenth century, when the invention of large ocean-going vessels and new navigation methods made maritime trade more competitive. Mercantilism and competition among Europe’s colonial powers helped pull commerce to the coastlines. Since then, commerce between Asia and Europe has traveled primarily by sea.1Against this historical backdrop, new railway services between China and Europe have emerged rapidly. Just 10 years ago, regular direct freight services from China to Europe did not exist.2 Today, they connect roughly 35 Chinese…

CPEC Jobs in Pakistan, salary details

JOBS...نوکریاں چائنہ کمپنی میںPlease help the deserving persons...Salary:Salary package in China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) in these 300,000 jobs shall be on daily wages. The details of the daily wages are as follows;Welder: Rs. 1,700 dailyHeavy Duty Driver: Rs. 1,700 dailyMason: Rs. 1,500 dailyHelper: Rs. 850 dailyElectrician: Rs. 1,700 dailySurveyor: Rs. 2,500 dailySecurity Guard: Rs. 1,600 dailyBulldozer operator: Rs. 2,200 dailyConcrete mixer machine operator: Rs. 2,000 dailyRoller operator: Rs. 2,000 dailySteel fixer: Rs. 2,200 dailyIron Shuttering fixer: Rs. 1,800 dailyAccount clerk: Rs. 2,200 dailyCarpenter: Rs. 1,700 dailyLight duty driver: Rs. 1,700 dailyLabour: Rs. 900 dailyPara Engine mechanic: Rs. 1,700 dailyPipe fitter: Rs. 1,700 dailyStorekeeper: Rs. 1,700 dailyOffice boy: Rs. 1,200 dailyExcavator operator: Rs. 2,200 dailyShovel operator: Rs. 2,200 dailyComputer operator: Rs. 2,200 dailySecurity Supervisor: Rs. 2,200 dailyCook for Chinese food: Rs. 2,000 dailyCook…