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Smashing the Bell Jar


madeinchina.com

Shades of Gender in China

January–March 2019

Sun and moon have no light left, earth is dark; / Our women’s world is sunk so deep, who can help us? / Jewelry sold to pay this trip across the seas, Cut off from my family I leave my native land. / Unbinding my feet I clean out a thousand years of poison, / With heated heart arouse all women’s spirits. / Alas, this delicate kerchief here / Is half stained with blood, and half with tears.

Qiu Jin, 1904 (translated by Jonathan Spence)

 

As she bode farewell to China in the summer of 1904, early revolutionary Qiu Jin penned these words to bemoan the fate of herself and of uncountable Chinese women. She was leaving behind her husband—whom she had married out of obligation—and two young children to go to study in Japan. Having returned to China, she would continue to engage in revolutionary activities, and was ultimately beheaded by the Qing authorities in July 1907 at the age of 31. Martyrdom made her into a legend. More than a century later, bound feet belong to another age and kerchieves stained with blood and tears have become an overused trope in revolutionary literature. Still, Qiu Jin’s spirit is more alive than ever in a whole new generation of Chinese feminists who are fighting for women’s rights—a renewed attempt to smash the bell jar of China’s patriarchal society. This issue of the Made in China Journal offers a series of perspectives on the plight and struggles of women and sexual minorities in today’s China.

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Table of Contents

Op-eds 

Transnational Carceral Capitalism in Xinjiang and Beyond|  Gerald Roche
State Repression in the Jasic Aftermath: From Punishment to Preemption |  Kevin Lin
Where Is China’s Interpol Chief?|  Maya Wang
Intellectual Property, Artificial Intelligence, and Ethical Dilemmas: China and the New Frontiers of Academic Integrity |  James Darrowby
From the Outside Looking In: A Response to John Garnaut’s Primer on Ideology |  Christian Sorace

China Columns 

Hidden Rules and the ‘Heartache’ of Chinese Government Officials |  Jie Yang
Against Atrophy: Party Organisations in Private Firms | Jude Blanchette
Anti-poverty Policies and Discourses of Blame in China | Yang Lichao and Robert Walker

Focus 

Chinese Feminism as We Know It: Public Pedagogies of the Anglophone Media Space | Dušica Ristivojević
Does China Have a Feminist Movement from the Left? |  Yige Dong
Beyond #MeToo in China: A Conversation with Zhang Leilei |  Nuala Gathercole Lam
Global Connections: Chinese Feminism, Tibet, and Xinjiang | Séagh Kehoe
Separated Again by a High Wall |  Zheng Churan
The Plight of Sex Workers in China: From Criminalisation and Abuse to Activism |  Tiantian Zheng
Accidental Activists: The Resistance of the ‘709’ Wives | Nicola Macbean
Queer History, Culture, and Activism in China: A Conversation with He Xiaopei |  Bao Hongweiand He Xiaopei

Window on Asia 

Descending into Debt in Cambodia |  Milford BatemanNithya NatarajanKatherine Brickell and Laurie Parsons
A Road to Forgetting: Friendship and Memory in China’s Belt and Road Initiative |  Yi Xiaocuo

Work of Arts 

Once Upon a Time in China: Lu Zhixiang’s Sketches of Shanghai’s Society in the 1930s |  Martina Caschera
Hooligan Sparrow: A Conversation with Wang Nanfu |  Zeng JinyanTan Jia and Wang Nanfu

Conversations 

Illiberal China: A Conversation with Daniel Vukovich | Christian Sorace and Daniel Vukovich

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